Devin Reed Shows You How To Use LinkedIn as a Publishing Platform

We all know about using LinkedIn as a promotional platform. It’s what 99% of B2B marketers do.

But most are missing out on using it as a publishing platform.

In the first ever guest episode of Demand Gen U, Mark Huber, Metadata’s Head of Brand & Product Marketing is joined by The Reeder‘s CEO & Content Strategy Advisor, Devin Reed, to discuss why LinkedIn should be considered an important publishing platform for brands.

Find out:

  • How to build a reputation on LinkedIn
  • The benefits of setting yourself content missions
  • How to come up with content ideas

For more on publishing to LinkedIn and other awesome tips from Devin, watch to the full episode below.

Three top takeaways:

Takeaway 1: Build trust and credibility

Most company pages lean heavily on the promotional side of LinkedIn content, without having earned trust and credibility among their target audience.

Building that reputation is crucial because when you do promote your core products that live on other platforms, people will be willing to engage with you, because you offered them value first.

Leading with value is key. Your audience are less likely to act if you haven’t earned a reputation beforehand.

So, weave promotion throughout your LinkedIn strategy – but consistently lead with value.

Takeaway 2: Check the indicators

As with any platform, it’s important to keep a close eye on engagement to see whether your LinkedIn output is working.

Devin believes that these are the responses you want from your audience – and in this order:

3. Reactions

Likes (and dislikes) are great performance indicators. They’re simple and, to some may be considered throwaway, but they are still a helpful form of validation and a reminder that your work is reaching people.

2. Comments

Commenting is brilliant as it provides you with verbal recognition and validation from your audience. Alternatively, somebody may comment disagreeing with what you’ve said and that starts a conversation as well.

Due to its specificity, it’s more helpful to receive comments than likes.

1. Shares

The best thing you can hope for is shares.

Well, somebody making a new piece of content and citing you as the inspiration is actually the ultimate response.

But sharing usually means that someone has consumed your content, been impressed and helped by what you’ve said, and felt the desire to distribute that knowledge to their own followers, opening you up to an even wider audience.

Followers, impressions, registrations, SAOs, and subscribers are slightly deeper indicators and tell you even more about whether your output is working.

Takeaway 3: The 3 E’s – educate, empower, equip

Devin is a big believer in following this framework with your team before heading into publishing on LinkedIn.

Educate your employees on your LinkedIn strategy and your plans to switch up your content from a promotion focus to a publication focus.

Empower them to post on LinkedIn. If the CEO or other senior staff members are inactive, it may be difficult for an employee to pluck up the courage to get going, so at Gong, they lead by example. Whether they post often or occasionally, the senior leadership team encourage staff members to be active on LinkedIn.

Lastly, equip your employees with the resources they need to approach LinkedIn effectively. Whether it be funding, extensive planning, or something else. Practices such as these will also encourage your audience to want to work for your company, as well as consume its content and use its services.

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